Israel / Palestine Bogus Argument #1: “Settlements aren’t really an obstacle to peace”

This is a new series of posts I’m going to work on, in which I debunk BA’s (bogus arguments) that are often made, on one side or the other, about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict (or the wider Arab-Israeli conflict, etc.).

Today’s Bogus Argument: “Settlements aren’t really an obstacle to peace,” often claimed by AIPAC supporters and other apologists for the Netanyahu gov’t. Actually, even though the argument often gets stated the way I just phrased it, what those making the argument usually mean when they say this is that Israeli announcements of plans to build new housing units within the large settlement blocs abutting Jerusalem are not really an obstacle to peace.

Let’s consider this argument.

Usually it is supported by two claims: one, that Palestinian complaints are disingenuous because both sides already know that a final status agreement would preserve the major Jerusalem settlement blocs within Israel and there would be compensatory land swaps to the Palestinian state; and two, that the Palestinians had previously engaged in negotiations w/o too much fuss despite periodic new Israeli building in the blocs.

Therefore, the argument goes, these Palestinian complaints (and those made by groups like Peace Now, J Street, and various Knesset members in the opposition) are disingenuous. The Palestinians, according to this theory, only complain over this for strategic and negotiating purposes, not because they are actually upset about new Jewish housing being built in neighborhoods that everyone knows will eventually be part of Israel. No, they press these complaints fully knowing them to be without merit, because they are actually not interested in going back to negotiations with Israel, and because they are not serious about accepting Israel’s right to exist as part of a two-state final status agreement. By insisting that Israel cease and desist from new construction in all the settlements, the Palestinians are, supposedly, making an unreasonable demand they know Israel won’t accept, and by doing so they are deliberately sabotaging peace talks and building up global animosity towards Israel as part of a long-term plan to one day get back all of what was British-ruled Palestine.

This line of reasoning, and its dismissal of Palestinian objections to new settlement construction, is, in my humble opinion, completely bogus. It’s wrong.

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What I Can Do For You!

As you may already have heard, I’m in the job market. I just want to share, widely, what I think I’m good at, and what kinds of work I’d be excited to do. Happy to talk with folks who may have leads, advice, or opportunities.
I would describe my top skills, experiences, and interests as follows:
  • interfaith collaboration
  • writing, especially for advocacy
  • essays / non-fiction writing / research-based journalistic pieces
  • teaching, especially making complex or often inaccessible cultural or religious ideas understandable to a general audience
  • organizing information and presentations
  • interpersonal communication, including strong people skills and cultural sensitivity skills
  • Hebrew (reading, writing, speaking)
  • French (pretty good but not as good as my Hebrew)
  • public speaking and presentations
  • social entrepreneur capabilities
  • Microsoft office suite, with strong Power Point / multi-media authorship skills
  • Biblical studies, rabbinic studies, and the ability to speak or write drawing on sacred texts
My passions include:
  • Israel/Palestine peacebuilding
  • collaborative business projects that build positive bonds between Palestinians and Israelis
  • Jewish / Muslim coalition building and mutual advocacy
  • LGBT equality
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  • progressive approaches to religion (promoting non-fundamentalist, non-exclusivist,”first-do-no-harm” approaches to all religion)
  • Democratic party politics in the US
  • income inequality / poverty
  • interfaith efforts on issues like undocumented immigrants in the US, environmental advocacy, human rights, etc.
  • supporting and researching interfaith families within the Jewish community (my last job was focused on this work)
I think I’d be a good candidate for jobs like:
  • lead writer / media content developer for an NGO or advocacy organization
  • Executive Director of an organization that would benefit from my strengths, and that would have the staff needed to take the lead in the areas in which I’m inexperiencedcropped-rfk-2.jpg
  • speech writer for political candidates or issue campaigns
  • university chaplain with some teaching duties in religious/Judaic studies
  • Judaic studies prof at a Christian small college (problem: I have no PhD and I need a full-time position)College_row_at_wesleyan
  • being hired to do a big research/writing project (like a book about a neglected historical figure or set of events, or a new curriculum, etc.), especially if it required some travel and use of my language skills.